Third and fourth graders are working on a map making lesson for the next few weeks.  In order for us to start thinking of maps as tools and as art, we examined maps in an atlas and then works by Vik Muniz (image above) and Mark Anthony Mulligan.  Both artists are featured in the book The Map as Art by Katharine Harmon.  Using the methods of Terry Barrett (if you are an art educator and don’t know of him, look him up!) we have begun to examine these works and maps as a whole.  I had never done this before, and I was so impressed by the insight and wisdom of my students!  These groups really blew me away me today and showed that young children can understand contemporary art and are excited to learn about it.  I can’t wait to do more of this this year!  

education art education maps terry barrett vik muniz mark anthony mulligan art map making elementary contemporary art the map as art katharine harmon classroom

Adventures in Pre-K Art Week Two!  We practiced drawing lines (and the letter “O” that they are studying this week) with colored glue.  I added a few drops of food coloring to the glue in the bottles as I refilled them.  I love how each child approached the lesson in a different way.   Some are so focused and careful, making small movements, while others enjoy the quick action of mark making.  

Lessons learned:  Talk about puddles.  Some just wanted to squeeze and not move their hand around the page.  I’m alright with puddles and that exploration, but it used up the glue so quickly!  Which is my #2 lesson learned.  Next time, do big bottles!  I think I have enough bottles that are even bigger than the standard size, which will be perfect.

Overall, they loved it and didn’t want to stop!  Some asked if we could do it again next week.  I’ll likely do it again in the future, maybe in another quarter, and see how I can improve the lesson.  It’s strange to only do a lesson once.  I’m used to teaching lessons at least five times, and usually around 10-15, so I get really good at them.  Just once is hard!  

education art education pre-k prek elementary art art ed line color arted ese sped

artteacherproblemss:

lairedcake:

heymstee:

baltimoreartlady:

Working on my new classroom!

Beautiful!

I have these hanging up, but it’s very difficult to put them in a spot where all of the students can see them. Trying something new this year where we focus solely on them for the first week or two before our larger projects begin.

APPROPRIATION    One of the most striking things about many of the curriculum projects was the routine use of appropriated materials. Whether created in the spirit of Romare Bearden’s histories of the African-American experience composed of fragments of found photos (Bearden & Henderson, 1993) or Kenny Scharf’s Junkie, in which painted purple vines entwine on a yellow field of retro insecticide ads (Tony Shafrazi Gallery, 1998), the student artwork often used print materials as the stuff out of which their art was composed. For the students, recycling imagery felt comfortable and commonplace. If one lives in a forest, wood will likely become one’s medium for creative play. If one grows up in a world filled with cheap, disposable images, they easily become the stuff of one’s own creative expression.
JUXTAPOSITION    Robert Rauschenberg revolutionized expressive painting when he substituted the seemingly random juxtaposition of found images for personally generated abstract marks (Forge, 1972). The modernist principle of contrast is not adequate to describe the energy generated by bringing together radically disparate elements, an artistic strategy utilized since Dada photomontage and Surrealist objects such as Meret Oppenheim’s fur-covered teacup (Burckhardt & Curiger, 1996). The term juxtaposition is useful in helping students discuss the familiar shocks of contemporary life in which images and objects from various realms and sensibilities come together as intentional clashes or random happenings.
RECONTEXTUALIZATION    Often, positioning a familiar image in relationship to pictures, symbols, or texts with which it is not usually associated generates meaning in an artwork. Hannah Höch, an early Dada proponent of the new medium of photomontage, created provocative works by recombining found imagery. In Die Braut of 1927, winged objects swirl around the central image of a traditional bride and groom. The woman’s head is replaced by an oversized image of a young child’s face (Makela & Boswell, 1996). This simple visual move changes any potential romantic fantasy readings of the bridal couple, shifting the focus to society’s degrading legal, religious, and cultural conventions regarding the status of women.    Though deconstruction has a more specific meaning in the theory of Jacques Derrida (Glusberg, 1991), in everyday art world parlance, recontextualization and deconstruction can often function synonymously. The magazine Adbusters has many examples of deconstructing contemporary advertisements by pairing the original ads with fragments of other images and texts that contextualize the consumer fantasies within environmental and global justice discourses.(FN5)
LAYERING    As images become cheap and plentiful, they are no longer treated as precious, but instead are often literally piled on top of each other. Layered imagery evoking the complexity of the unconscious mind is a familiar strategy in Surrealist art and of early experimental approaches to photography. In postmodern works by artists such as David Salle, Sigmar Polke, and Adrian Piper, the strategy evokes the layered complexity of contemporary cultural life (Fox, 1987; Grosenick, 2001). Multiple layers of varying transparency will increasingly be a readily available strategy to students because it is a common feature of most digital imaging programs such as Adobe Photoshop(R) (Freeman, 2001).
INTERACTION OF TEXT & IMAGE    In a 1990 montage, artist Barbara Kruger paired a photograph of a woman, peering through a magnifying glass, with a greatly enlarged eye, with the text “It’s a small world but not if you have to clean it” (Emerson, 1999, p. 127). The text does not describe the work, nor does the image illustrate the text. The interplay between the two elements generates rich and ironic associations about gender, social possibilities, and cleanliness. Students who make and value art in the 21st century must learn not to demand a literal match of verbal and visual signifiers, but rather to explore disjuncture between these modes as a source of meaning and pleasure.
HYBRIDITY    Many contemporary artists incorporate various media into their pieces, using whatever is required to fully investigate the subject. Contemporary artists routinely create sculptural installations utilizing new media such as large-scale projections of video, sound pieces, digital photography, and computer animation. Indeed, multi-media works of art are now encountered in contemporary museums and galleries more frequently than traditional sculpted or painted objects.    The concept of hybridity also describes the cultural blending evident in many works. New York and Tokyo-based Mariko Mori draws on costuming, make-up, popular culture, and traditional Buddhist beliefs to create complex photographic and video installations. Her work explores boundaries between spirituality and cyberculture, between the human and the re-creation of the human through technology (Fineberg, 2000).
GAZING    In Betye Saar’s The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, the traditional meaning of the saccharine image is challenged when it is presented with an even more stereotypical depiction of a wide-eyed, red-lipped African-American woman holding a broom in one hand and a rifle in the other, juxtposed with a life-size Black Power clenched fist (Broude & Garrard, 1994). By shifting the context within which a familiar advertising image is seen, students spontaneously question who creates and controls imagery and how this imagery affects our understandings of reality—an important activity of visual culture art education.    The term gaze is frequently used in contemporary discourses to recognize that when talking about the act of looking, it is important to consider who is being looked at and who is doing the looking (Olin, 1996). Gazing, associated with issues of knowledge and pleasure, is also a form of power and of controlling perceptions of what is “real” and “natural.” Much critical theory in art history and film studies makes use of the term to investigate how our notions of “others” are constructed through proprietary acts of looking and representing. For example, consider the standard art historical discussion of Gaughin’s depiction of Tahitian women in which his Orientalist theories and projections of spirituality, timelessness, and sensuousness determine our perception of the women (Janson, 1968).
REPRESENTIN’    U.S. urban street slang for proclaiming one’s identity and affiliations, representin’ describes the strategy of locating one’s artistic voice within one’s own personal history and culture of origin. David Wojnarowicz grounded his art in his experiences as a young, gay man in New York during the emerging AIDS crisis (Scholder, 1999). Tracey Emin makes funky mixed media paintings and objects that investigate all aspects of her life, including crummy jobs, alcohol abuse, and sexuality (Riemschneider & Grosenick, 1999). Shirin Neshat creates video installations and photo text works that explore the psychological conditions of women in Islamic societies (Grosenick, 2001). It is important that art classes provide students with opportunities for meaningful self-expression in which they become representin’, self-creating beings. These opportunities should allow students to see examples of contemporary artists using artmaking to explore the potentials and problems inherent in their own cultural and political settings (Gude, 2003).
[From: Postmodern Principles: In search of a 21st century art education by Olivia Gude, 2004]

Gude <3  

artteacherproblemss:

lairedcake:

heymstee:

baltimoreartlady:

Working on my new classroom!

Beautiful!

I have these hanging up, but it’s very difficult to put them in a spot where all of the students can see them. Trying something new this year where we focus solely on them for the first week or two before our larger projects begin.

APPROPRIATION
    One of the most striking things about many of the curriculum projects was the routine use of appropriated materials. Whether created in the spirit of Romare Bearden’s histories of the African-American experience composed of fragments of found photos (Bearden & Henderson, 1993) or Kenny Scharf’s Junkie, in which painted purple vines entwine on a yellow field of retro insecticide ads (Tony Shafrazi Gallery, 1998), the student artwork often used print materials as the stuff out of which their art was composed. For the students, recycling imagery felt comfortable and commonplace. If one lives in a forest, wood will likely become one’s medium for creative play. If one grows up in a world filled with cheap, disposable images, they easily become the stuff of one’s own creative expression.

JUXTAPOSITION
    Robert Rauschenberg revolutionized expressive painting when he substituted the seemingly random juxtaposition of found images for personally generated abstract marks (Forge, 1972). The modernist principle of contrast is not adequate to describe the energy generated by bringing together radically disparate elements, an artistic strategy utilized since Dada photomontage and Surrealist objects such as Meret Oppenheim’s fur-covered teacup (Burckhardt & Curiger, 1996). The term juxtaposition is useful in helping students discuss the familiar shocks of contemporary life in which images and objects from various realms and sensibilities come together as intentional clashes or random happenings.

RECONTEXTUALIZATION
    Often, positioning a familiar image in relationship to pictures, symbols, or texts with which it is not usually associated generates meaning in an artwork. Hannah Höch, an early Dada proponent of the new medium of photomontage, created provocative works by recombining found imagery. In Die Braut of 1927, winged objects swirl around the central image of a traditional bride and groom. The woman’s head is replaced by an oversized image of a young child’s face (Makela & Boswell, 1996). This simple visual move changes any potential romantic fantasy readings of the bridal couple, shifting the focus to society’s degrading legal, religious, and cultural conventions regarding the status of women.
    Though deconstruction has a more specific meaning in the theory of Jacques Derrida (Glusberg, 1991), in everyday art world parlance, recontextualization and deconstruction can often function synonymously. The magazine Adbusters has many examples of deconstructing contemporary advertisements by pairing the original ads with fragments of other images and texts that contextualize the consumer fantasies within environmental and global justice discourses.(FN5)

LAYERING
    As images become cheap and plentiful, they are no longer treated as precious, but instead are often literally piled on top of each other. Layered imagery evoking the complexity of the unconscious mind is a familiar strategy in Surrealist art and of early experimental approaches to photography. In postmodern works by artists such as David Salle, Sigmar Polke, and Adrian Piper, the strategy evokes the layered complexity of contemporary cultural life (Fox, 1987; Grosenick, 2001). Multiple layers of varying transparency will increasingly be a readily available strategy to students because it is a common feature of most digital imaging programs such as Adobe Photoshop(R) (Freeman, 2001).

INTERACTION OF TEXT & IMAGE
    In a 1990 montage, artist Barbara Kruger paired a photograph of a woman, peering through a magnifying glass, with a greatly enlarged eye, with the text “It’s a small world but not if you have to clean it” (Emerson, 1999, p. 127). The text does not describe the work, nor does the image illustrate the text. The interplay between the two elements generates rich and ironic associations about gender, social possibilities, and cleanliness. Students who make and value art in the 21st century must learn not to demand a literal match of verbal and visual signifiers, but rather to explore disjuncture between these modes as a source of meaning and pleasure.

HYBRIDITY
    Many contemporary artists incorporate various media into their pieces, using whatever is required to fully investigate the subject. Contemporary artists routinely create sculptural installations utilizing new media such as large-scale projections of video, sound pieces, digital photography, and computer animation. Indeed, multi-media works of art are now encountered in contemporary museums and galleries more frequently than traditional sculpted or painted objects.
    The concept of hybridity also describes the cultural blending evident in many works. New York and Tokyo-based Mariko Mori draws on costuming, make-up, popular culture, and traditional Buddhist beliefs to create complex photographic and video installations. Her work explores boundaries between spirituality and cyberculture, between the human and the re-creation of the human through technology (Fineberg, 2000).

GAZING
    In Betye Saar’s The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, the traditional meaning of the saccharine image is challenged when it is presented with an even more stereotypical depiction of a wide-eyed, red-lipped African-American woman holding a broom in one hand and a rifle in the other, juxtposed with a life-size Black Power clenched fist (Broude & Garrard, 1994). By shifting the context within which a familiar advertising image is seen, students spontaneously question who creates and controls imagery and how this imagery affects our understandings of reality—an important activity of visual culture art education.
    The term gaze is frequently used in contemporary discourses to recognize that when talking about the act of looking, it is important to consider who is being looked at and who is doing the looking (Olin, 1996). Gazing, associated with issues of knowledge and pleasure, is also a form of power and of controlling perceptions of what is “real” and “natural.” Much critical theory in art history and film studies makes use of the term to investigate how our notions of “others” are constructed through proprietary acts of looking and representing. For example, consider the standard art historical discussion of Gaughin’s depiction of Tahitian women in which his Orientalist theories and projections of spirituality, timelessness, and sensuousness determine our perception of the women (Janson, 1968).

REPRESENTIN’
    U.S. urban street slang for proclaiming one’s identity and affiliations, representin’ describes the strategy of locating one’s artistic voice within one’s own personal history and culture of origin. David Wojnarowicz grounded his art in his experiences as a young, gay man in New York during the emerging AIDS crisis (Scholder, 1999). Tracey Emin makes funky mixed media paintings and objects that investigate all aspects of her life, including crummy jobs, alcohol abuse, and sexuality (Riemschneider & Grosenick, 1999). Shirin Neshat creates video installations and photo text works that explore the psychological conditions of women in Islamic societies (Grosenick, 2001). It is important that art classes provide students with opportunities for meaningful self-expression in which they become representin’, self-creating beings. These opportunities should allow students to see examples of contemporary artists using artmaking to explore the potentials and problems inherent in their own cultural and political settings (Gude, 2003).

[From: Postmodern Principles: In search of a 21st century art education by Olivia Gude, 2004]

Gude <3  

(via tbnl)

education art education

artededucator:

6th grade project on color. Students first draw flowers with glue and let the glue dry. (Edited for clarification: Students use a regular glue bottle and “draw” with the glue on the paper. They squeeze the glue out onto the paper, and the glue forms the lines. I don’t have students use pencil because it allows the glue to flow more freely, which makes the end result a bit more abstract. Pro tip: don’t put the nozzle of the glue bottle directly onto the paper— it needs to be held up an inch or so above the paper so that the glue dries “thicker”. Hope this helps!)
Then we paint with watercolors, trying to get variations of colors. We do a watercolor color wheel before this so students can practice mixing colors and using watercolor paints. The dried glue acts as a resist. This keeps the paints together (students often have a hard time controlling watercolors—especially 6th graders). The dried glue also just looks awesome!
After everything is painted students used extra fine tip sharpies to outline each color variation. This allows students to notice even the smallest variations. It also makes the final product look cool!
(Time frame: 1 day to practice drawing and to draw with glue. Two days to paint, possibly beginning sharpie on day two. One to two full days of sharpie use. And somewhere in there we read a Scholastic art magazine about color.)

artededucator:

6th grade project on color. Students first draw flowers with glue and let the glue dry. (Edited for clarification: Students use a regular glue bottle and “draw” with the glue on the paper. They squeeze the glue out onto the paper, and the glue forms the lines. I don’t have students use pencil because it allows the glue to flow more freely, which makes the end result a bit more abstract. Pro tip: don’t put the nozzle of the glue bottle directly onto the paper— it needs to be held up an inch or so above the paper so that the glue dries “thicker”. Hope this helps!)

Then we paint with watercolors, trying to get variations of colors. We do a watercolor color wheel before this so students can practice mixing colors and using watercolor paints. The dried glue acts as a resist. This keeps the paints together (students often have a hard time controlling watercolors—especially 6th graders). The dried glue also just looks awesome!

After everything is painted students used extra fine tip sharpies to outline each color variation. This allows students to notice even the smallest variations. It also makes the final product look cool!

(Time frame: 1 day to practice drawing and to draw with glue. Two days to paint, possibly beginning sharpie on day two. One to two full days of sharpie use. And somewhere in there we read a Scholastic art magazine about color.)

Line variation

fattyonfire:

fattyonfire:

Anyone have a really good line variation lesson for 3rd grade range? We just finished landscapes/space (I know, I started out of order on accident).

Let me know!

Edit: tagging
mvmarcz
and
mpinaire
in case you don’t see this in your feed :)

Look up Sumi Ink Club!  There are some great short videos on youtube that you could show in class about the people who created it and the reasons for it being a member of the club.  It’s a fun collaborative activity that will allow students to experiment with line.  I actually did it in grad school (we then cut up the paper into long strips and made books, but that’s another direction www.pinairestudio.tumblr.com) .  I plan on doing it later this year and I’ll likely use powdered black paint in order to avoid the accidents that I know will come with ink.  I’ll also be able to get the consistency of paint that I’m looking for.  The final images would be great to display around school!  

art education education sumi ink club sumi ink

All grades are busy painting!  

Found the sink like this after first grade.  Most kids normally put them in a stack.  Apparently someone was organizing them for me today :)

In kindergarten, students learn to put their mixing trays in the sink and in first grade they’ll learn how to clean them themselves.  In second grade, I have students refill their water cups and do mixing trays.  It really comes down to how big the students are.  My two sinks are up really high and they’re hard to reach even with the step stools.

education art education art classroom third year teacher elementary arted art ed painting classroom procedures teacher

Grades 3-5 color practice!
We&#8217;ve been working on reviewing color mixing and getting comfortable painting again.  To switch things up, I called the practice our Color Mixing Challenge.  The challenge was matching colors from paint chips.  I asked them to match one on the paint chip, go back to mixing their own colors, and then we switch as a class when we were all ready.   The activity allowed me to talk with each student about their colors, how they made them, and how they can alter the colors.  It really allows me to gauge their understanding.  
I was quite impressed by how accurate they were and how much they got into it!  I thought that we would switch paint chips three times or so, but they wanted to use them for the whole class.  Some students went on to match and paint the entire strip.  I&#8217;m also really impressed by the level at which we are starting this year.  These kids know their stuff! 

Grades 3-5 color practice!

We’ve been working on reviewing color mixing and getting comfortable painting again.  To switch things up, I called the practice our Color Mixing Challenge.  The challenge was matching colors from paint chips.  I asked them to match one on the paint chip, go back to mixing their own colors, and then we switch as a class when we were all ready.   The activity allowed me to talk with each student about their colors, how they made them, and how they can alter the colors.  It really allows me to gauge their understanding.  

I was quite impressed by how accurate they were and how much they got into it!  I thought that we would switch paint chips three times or so, but they wanted to use them for the whole class.  Some students went on to match and paint the entire strip.  I’m also really impressed by the level at which we are starting this year.  These kids know their stuff! 

education art education third year teacher color mixing color theory art elementary paint chips painting arted art ed art teacher

I taught my first ever Pre-K class today!  It was supposed to be our Pre-K ESE class and then the VPK class, but today they were combined because of a program they were doing after.  I wasn’t prepared for that, but I could quickly make up more trays.  All 24 students got messy and had a great time.  I love having all of their teachers in the room to help and I’m excited to do this every Friday :)  We are the only school in the county to have Pre-K visit every special area class every week! 

Today, we made lots and lots of circles with the primary colors!  Look at all of that fantastic exploration!  

education art education third year teacher pre-k elementary early childhood education ese SPED art arted art ed prek kindergarten

Second week of kindergarten!

With kindergarten, and especially a kindergarten class of 31, my being extremely prepared makes the class.  Third year kindergarten is so much easier than previous years because I know how to get things ready.

For about the first 9 weeks, I write the name of each student on his or her paper.  But students need to practice writing their names and practice having their names on the backs of their papers, so I make three lines and write their name neatly on the top.  While I help students get in their seats or pass something out, all students practice writing their name two times on the other lines.  They don’t get to have the rest of the supplies and start until they write their own name.

I also have the room set up and ready for them.  Papers are at their seats (we’re not ready to learn passing out procedures yet because they can’t read the names on the papers) and my six extra chairs are pulled up to the tables.

Our assignment this week helps me gauge fine motor skills.  Students trace cups and color in the sections.  Only takes a few minutes.  Developing these skills in art is so important because the younger grades now have to push reading and math from the start.  They no longer have time to devote to holding pencils, tracing, and using scissors.  I truly feel that art educators play a crucial role in helping the youngest students develop fine motor skills. 

education art education third year teacher kindergarten elementary art arted teacher classroom

Our new Number One Art Class awards!  I give the giant paintbrushes to the class in each grade level that has the highest number of Roars (our class points) for the month.  The teachers hang the brushes outside of their classrooms for the next month, then I go and collect them and redistribute them to the new number one classes.

This year, I made the brushes out of wood and spray painted them.  The wood was about $14 (made 9 brushes) and I had a teacher’s husband help me cut them.  I’ve made them from paper in the past, but I wanted to have ones that will last much longer. 

And this little guy picked out a shirt with the primary colors to wear to art today.  I really don’t think there’s anything much cuter than that :)

art education education elementary classroom management class rewards class incentives art arted

I want to vamp my art ed library.

artteacheradventures:

I have a ton of elementary children’s books but I would love books my middle schoolers would enjoy. Any suggestions msleahqueenhbic, artfulartsyamy, mpinaire, artbrarian or any other wonderful art-edders out there?

I LOVE my elementary art related library.  I spend way too much on children’s books.  But middle school is more difficult.  I read to my little ones often and sometimes to my older ones, but I really should do it more.  All kids enjoy being read to, and I really enjoy it, too.

Maybe you could read aloud a shorter chapter book over a period of time and have a related project.  The school library will have class sets of books for you to check out and could hep pick books that are the appropriate level.  If your state does a literacy week, you could possibly tie it in.  Or a book that relates to local history (In Florida, I’m thinking A Land Remembered) that could work with a history teacher’s unit and/or public art project.  

Our favorite books right now (although younger) are Iggy Peck, Architect, Too Much Glue, Monsters Love Colors, and Stuck.

education art education elementary middle school

EDD: Tall tumblr teachers…

understand the struggles with pants.  Old Navy has some great Tall cropped ones right now (the ‘boyfriend’ ones- good weight, soft, straight leg) that are affordable and Banana Republic makes the only full length pants that I have found that are long enough and slim enough.  

Where do you all find nice long work pants (because we all know that just because they call them Talls doesn’t mean they actually are)?

EDD education dare day

Kindergarten Art Centers

This year, I am going to do centers with my kindergartners and maybe first graders.  Because of larger class sizes this year, I think that small groups will work best.  During most classes, I’d like to have two independent rotating centers unrelated to the ongoing project and one center that is the main project where I will be spending the most time.  I have blocks, modeling clay, tissue paper, big foam alphabet stamps, and all of the usual art supplies.  Any ideas or tips for kindergarten art centers?

education art education kindergarten elementary centers pre-k first grade art classroom lesson plan EDD education dare day

First week project for the little ones (K-2)!

So simple.  On the first day, we practice coming in the room, finding seats, passing things out, turning papers in, writing name/teacher/grade on papers, and lining up!  Decorating apples can take 5 minutes or 15 depending on what the class needs, and it’s more special that coloring a normal white paper.  Some classes even had time to read a book and review colors and color mixing at the end of the block.

education art education third year teacher classroom First day of school art drawing elementary kindergarten arted teacher art teacher classroom management classroom procedures procedures